Midgard

The early 20th century inventor and designer Curt Fischer spent time researching ways in which he might be able to improve the light quality in his town's factories during the 19-teens. Upon visiting and speaking with the workers, it was discovered that the downward-casting overhead lighting created shadows on their work surfaces. And so the first articulating lamp was designed and patented. Used on the wall or desktop, this adjustable lamp even allows for an optional asymmetrical rotatable shade to block direct light from the user's eye.

After nearly 100 years surviving war and depression, Midgard was purchased and brought back to life in 2014 by long time collector David Einsiedler and his partner Joke Rasch. Using the exact tooling and machines from the original factory and staying true to the designs and materials used decades before, Midgard is now a reputable supplier of lighting for homes as well as many large corporations who wish to outfit their offices with quality, functional and well designed lighting.

Midgard modular lights were once affixed to tools in facilities including the metal workshop at the Bauhaus. Used by surgeons, architects and engineers for decades, the utility of this system lends itself as a helphul home addition.

The K831 directional pendant follows a rare draft of a 1930s light from Kandem and is in the tradition and respect to the then used materials and processes. The swiveling shade allows the user to direct the light where needed. All parts are made in Germany and the lamp is manually assembled in hamburg.